How Do I Know If My ECG Is Normal?

What can an ECG tell you?

An ECG (electrocardiogram) records the electrical activity of your heart at rest.

It provides information about your heart rate and rhythm, and shows if there is enlargement of the heart due to high blood pressure (hypertension) or evidence of a previous heart attack (myocardial infarction)..

Can ECG give false readings?

The study of 500 patients found a false positive reading between 77 and 82 percent in patients screened by electrocardiogram, and a false negative reading between 6 percent to 7 percent in the same patient population.

What is an abnormal ECG reading?

An abnormal EKG can mean many things. Sometimes an EKG abnormality is a normal variation of a heart’s rhythm, which does not affect your health. Other times, an abnormal EKG can signal a medical emergency, such as a myocardial infarction (heart attack) or a dangerous arrhythmia.

Is ECG enough to detect heart problems?

Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) to assess the heart rate and rhythm. This test can often detect heart disease, heart attack, an enlarged heart, or abnormal heart rhythms that may cause heart failure. Chest X-ray to see if the heart is enlarged and if the lungs are congested with fluid.

What is the normal ECG rate?

A normal ECG is illustrated above. Note that the heart is beating in a regular sinus rhythm between 60 – 100 beats per minute (specifically 82 bpm).

How do you read ECG results?

Check the date and time that the ECG was performed.Step 1 – Heart rate.Step 2 – Heart rhythm.Step 4 – P waves.Step 5 – PR interval.Step 6 – QRS complex.Step 7 – ST segment.Step 8 – T waves.

How do you know if your ECG is normal?

Normal range up to 120 ms (3 small squares on ECG paper). QT interval (measured from first deflection of QRS complex to end of T wave at isoelectric line). Normal range up to 440 ms (though varies with heart rate and may be slightly longer in females)

What can affect an ECG reading?

These include:Obesity.Anatomical considerations, such as the size of the chest and the location of the heart within the chest.Movement during the test.Exercise or smoking before the test.Certain medicines.Electrolyte imbalances, such as too much or too little potassium, magnesium, or calcium in the blood.

Does being nervous affect ECG?

Anxiety can profoundly alter the ECG, probably via changes in autonomic nervous system function, as evidenced by the ECG normalizing with manoeuvres that normalize autonomic function (reassurance, rest, and anxiolytics and beta-blockers), with catecholamine infusion producing similar ECG changes.